Monthly Archives: February 2017

Flow And Kitchen Design

Let's take a look at some common flow plans for food preparation that you'll discover inside the kitchen. The most basic, and most desirable, flow plan is the straight line, also known as the assembly-line flow. Materials move steadily from 1 procedure to another in a straight line. This type of style minimizes backtracking; it saves preparation time and confusion about what's going out of the kitchen area and what's coming back in.

The straight-line arrangement functions nicely for little installations because it can be placed against a wall and adapted to the cooks' duties. Wherever there is not enough room to arrange food preparation in a straight line, a well-liked and efficient option is the parallel flow. There are four variations of the parallel style:

1. Back to back. Gear is arranged inside a long, central counter or island in two straight lines that run parallel to every other. Sometimes a four- or five-foot room divider or low wall is positioned between the two lines. It's primarily a safety precaution, which keeps noise and clutter to a minimum and prevents liquids spilled on 1 side from spreading onto the other. Nevertheless, placement of a wall here also makes cleaning and sanitation a lot more hard. The back-to-back arrangement centralizes plumbing and utilities;

you may not need to install as many drains, sinks, or outlets, as both sides from the counter can share the same ones. A back-to-back arrangement in which the pass window is parallel to (and behind one of) the production places is sometimes recognized as a California-style kitchen. When the pass window is located perpendicular towards the production line, it might be referred to as a European-style kitchen area style. The benefit from the European style is that each cook on the line can see the progression of multiple dishes that make up 1 table's order.

2. Face to face. In this kitchen area configuration, a central aisle separates two straight lines of gear on either side from the room. Sometimes the aisle is wide sufficient to add a straight line of worktables among the two rows of gear. This setup works well for high volume feeding facilities like schools and hospitals, but it does not take benefit of single source utilities. Even though it's a great layout for supervision of workers, it forces individuals to perform with their backs to one another, in effect, separating the cooking from the food from the rest from the distribution procedure. Therefore, it's most likely not the best style for a restaurant.

3. L-shape. Wherever room is not sufficient for a straight-line or parallel arrangement, the L-shape kitchen design is nicely suited to access several groups of gear, and is adaptable for table service restaurants. It gives you the ability to place more equipment inside a smaller room. You'll often find an L-shape design in dish washing areas, using the dish machine positioned at the center corner from the L.

4. U-shape. This arrangement is seldom used, but it's ideal for a little room with one or two employees, such as a salad preparation or pantry area. An island bar, for example the ones in TGI Friday's restaurants, is an additional example of the U-shape at perform. There are also circular and square kitchen area designs, but their limited flow patterns make them impractical. Avoid wasted room if you can, by making your kitchen area rectangular, with its entrance on one of the longest walls to save steps.

The a lot more foodservice establishments you visit, the more you'll realize that the back from the house is really a separate and distinct entity from the rest of the business, with its own peculiar difficulties and unique solutions.

Correct flow planning occasionally means breaking each kitchen area function down into a department, of sorts, after which deciding how those departments ought to interact with every other. They must also interact using the other, external departments from the facility: your dining room, bar, cashier, and so on. A great way to begin the design process-both for the overall company and for the kitchen-is to create a bubble diagram. Each region (or workstation) is represented being a circle, or "bubble," drawn in pencil within the location you've decided may be the most logical for that function. If two different workstations will be sharing some equipment, you might let the sides of their circles intersect slightly, to indicate where the shared equipment might greatest be located.

The finished diagram will seem abstract, but the exercise permits you to visualize every perform center and think about its needs in relation to the other centers. You are able to also lay a kitchen out utilizing a diamond configuration, situating the cooking area at one point of the diamond form, and other crucial areas in relation to it at other points. Notice that this layout minimizes confusion (and accidents) with a separate kitchen entrance and exit. This allows the people who bus the tables to deliver soiled dishes towards the dishwashing area without having to walk via the entire kitchen to do so.

An alternative to drawing diagrams is to list every perform center and then list any other work middle that should be placed adjacent to it. Conversely, list any perform center that ought to not be next to it. For instance, it is most likely not a great idea to have the ice maker and ice storage bin adjacent to the frying and broiling center.

Flow And Kitchen Design

Let's take a look at some common flow plans for food preparation that you'll discover inside the kitchen. The most basic, and most desirable, flow plan is the straight line, also known as the assembly-line flow. Materials move steadily from 1 procedure to another in a straight line. This type of style minimizes backtracking; it saves preparation time and confusion about what's going out of the kitchen area and what's coming back in.

The straight-line arrangement functions nicely for little installations because it can be placed against a wall and adapted to the cooks' duties. Wherever there is not enough room to arrange food preparation in a straight line, a well-liked and efficient option is the parallel flow. There are four variations of the parallel style:

1. Back to back. Gear is arranged inside a long, central counter or island in two straight lines that run parallel to every other. Sometimes a four- or five-foot room divider or low wall is positioned between the two lines. It's primarily a safety precaution, which keeps noise and clutter to a minimum and prevents liquids spilled on 1 side from spreading onto the other. Nevertheless, placement of a wall here also makes cleaning and sanitation a lot more hard. The back-to-back arrangement centralizes plumbing and utilities;

you may not need to install as many drains, sinks, or outlets, as both sides from the counter can share the same ones. A back-to-back arrangement in which the pass window is parallel to (and behind one of) the production places is sometimes recognized as a California-style kitchen. When the pass window is located perpendicular towards the production line, it might be referred to as a European-style kitchen area style. The benefit from the European style is that each cook on the line can see the progression of multiple dishes that make up 1 table's order.

2. Face to face. In this kitchen area configuration, a central aisle separates two straight lines of gear on either side from the room. Sometimes the aisle is wide sufficient to add a straight line of worktables among the two rows of gear. This setup works well for high volume feeding facilities like schools and hospitals, but it does not take benefit of single source utilities. Even though it's a great layout for supervision of workers, it forces individuals to perform with their backs to one another, in effect, separating the cooking from the food from the rest from the distribution procedure. Therefore, it's most likely not the best style for a restaurant.

3. L-shape. Wherever room is not sufficient for a straight-line or parallel arrangement, the L-shape kitchen design is nicely suited to access several groups of gear, and is adaptable for table service restaurants. It gives you the ability to place more equipment inside a smaller room. You'll often find an L-shape design in dish washing areas, using the dish machine positioned at the center corner from the L.

4. U-shape. This arrangement is seldom used, but it's ideal for a little room with one or two employees, such as a salad preparation or pantry area. An island bar, for example the ones in TGI Friday's restaurants, is an additional example of the U-shape at perform. There are also circular and square kitchen area designs, but their limited flow patterns make them impractical. Avoid wasted room if you can, by making your kitchen area rectangular, with its entrance on one of the longest walls to save steps.

The a lot more foodservice establishments you visit, the more you'll realize that the back from the house is really a separate and distinct entity from the rest of the business, with its own peculiar difficulties and unique solutions.

Correct flow planning occasionally means breaking each kitchen area function down into a department, of sorts, after which deciding how those departments ought to interact with every other. They must also interact using the other, external departments from the facility: your dining room, bar, cashier, and so on. A great way to begin the design process-both for the overall company and for the kitchen-is to create a bubble diagram. Each region (or workstation) is represented being a circle, or "bubble," drawn in pencil within the location you've decided may be the most logical for that function. If two different workstations will be sharing some equipment, you might let the sides of their circles intersect slightly, to indicate where the shared equipment might greatest be located.

The finished diagram will seem abstract, but the exercise permits you to visualize every perform center and think about its needs in relation to the other centers. You are able to also lay a kitchen out utilizing a diamond configuration, situating the cooking area at one point of the diamond form, and other crucial areas in relation to it at other points. Notice that this layout minimizes confusion (and accidents) with a separate kitchen entrance and exit. This allows the people who bus the tables to deliver soiled dishes towards the dishwashing area without having to walk via the entire kitchen to do so.

An alternative to drawing diagrams is to list every perform center and then list any other work middle that should be placed adjacent to it. Conversely, list any perform center that ought to not be next to it. For instance, it is most likely not a great idea to have the ice maker and ice storage bin adjacent to the frying and broiling center.

Benefits of Leisure and Recreation

Although it may not seem so, in reality, Leisure and Recreation is the largest industry in the world. The benefits of leisure and recreation as an important part of life are easy to see. As an industry, it offers a variety of related employment and creates billions of dollars in revenue. Workers in parks and recreation, community agencies, sports agencies, youth development organizations, non-profit organizations, rehab and hospital agencies, the travel and entertainment industries all utilize and benefit from parks and recreation facilities world-wide. Additional benefits of leisure and recreation include environmental improvements from expanding green spaces, health benefits, and personal satisfaction benefits.

There are many civic benefits of leisure and recreation activities. Sports and youth activities offer leadership development for adults and children. Strong communities are built as parks become a hub of community life. Benefits extend to all ages, childhood, youth, young adults, families, and seniors. Both care for environment and wellness through green spaces are enhanced by beauty. This same beauty helps combat stress through the opportunity for mild exercise and mediation upon natural beauty. Wilderness experiences are available in some locations.

For personal benefits, leisure activities may include:
Hobbies
Exercise
Sports
Gardening
Crafts
Health
Coping
Family Bonding

Physical benefits include increased lung capacity from sports participation, plus reducing serum cholesterol and hypertension, increasing bone mass, strengthening the spine, reducing disease, increase in feelings of well being, reduction in stress hormones, improved attitudes and performances, and improved social skills. For childhood development, recreational areas assist in learning, can keep kids off the streets, and enhance their confidence. Studies confirm that physical activity can aid the learning process in children. Sports activities enhance large motor skill development and social skills. Adult leaders offer positive role models to children. Group sports are well known for promoting social support, networking, and developing friendships.

As if all the above is not enough to encourage support of leisure and recreational activities, consider the following additional benefits:

Stress management – the mild stress of leisure activity can reduce overall negative stress by contributing to relaxation.

Self esteem – especially in children and seniors, mild exercise, group activities, and hobbies and crafts will help create positive self images.

Positive lifestyle development – contributing to society, social interaction, development of leaders, being part of organized sports all encourage good lifetime activities.

Personal satisfaction – any creative outlet will enhance personal satisfaction. Being part of the leadership offers self satisfaction, and those who work in the recreational areas can feel the pride in keeping these areas vital and available to others.

Quality of life – fresh air, sunshine, social interaction, health benefits and self esteem all will improve quality of life.

Preventative health – regular exercise, physiological benefits from mild exercise, and stress reduction all are made easier by having leisure and recreational activities readily available.

Since the future seems to be headed for a shorter work week and more extra time, support of leisure and recreational outlets and locations would be prudent, and benefit all involved.

Rich and Varied Heritage

India is always remembered as a land of diverse cultures. The geographic position, climate and the extent of exposure to foreign cultures have totally influenced the traditions and culture of the different regions at different periods. The greatness of Indian culture has been in adopting the best from all the invaders and intermingling their customs and styles with the existing and this is visible in all aspects of culture.

Indian culture have always been attached to the great river systems, the watersheds of the Indus and Ganges, the Deccan plateau and South India.

Secular India is home to Hinduism, Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism and other innumerable religious traditions. Hinduism is the dominant religious faith followed by the majority of the population. Colorful traditional festivals are almost 400 that have been happening for centuries. Not a single day passes by without a festival in one region or the other. It is an occasion for men to put on a new traditional costumes and jewelery.

Traditional wears like the silk saris, cholis have fascinated many a traveler over the centuries. Men in villages are still more comfortable in traditional attire like kurtas, lungis, dhotis and pyjamas.

Indian literature, Indian poetry, Indian epic poetry Ramayana and Mahabharata, Painting, Sculpture, Architecture- everything is depicted and interpreted through religion and philosophy.

Well known classical styles of dancing on the Indian stage are Bharatanatyam, Kathakali, Odissi, Kathak, and Manipuri. Folk dances also contribute to the plethora of Indian dances. The common root of all classical dance forms can be traced to Natyasastra, ascribed to Sage Bharata who is believed to have lived between the 1st and 2nd Century AD

18 Indian languages ​​with 1600 regional dialects are spoken and the linguistic lines are drawn by State boundaries Besides Hindi and English, the other popular languages ​​are Assamese, Bengali, Gujarati, Kannada, Kashmiri, Konkani, Sanskrit, Sindhi, Tamil, Malayalam, Marathi, punjabi, Oriya, Telugu and Urdu

Indian Cuisine skill lies in the subtle blending of a variety of spices to make various delicious recipes. These spices are used as home medicines too.

A typical North-Indian meal would consist of wheat. Rice is the staple diet in South Indian food. Coconut and oil are essential ingredients in all the meal. A meal is rounded off with betel leaf which holds an assortment of digestive part.

Women are the mirrors of culture of a society. Indian women are becoming increasingly visible and successful in the professional and public sphere. Whether it is Barkha Dutt, Arundhati Roy, Kiran Mazumdar Shaw, they have all heralded the arrival of Indian women professionals.

Latest outsourcing of technological agility, quality, flexibility, cost control, time-to-market and competitive advantage have made India well known in the business world.

India exports software to 95 countries around the world, outsource high quality brain-power 82% of the US companies ranked India as their first choice for software outsourcing.

Flow And Kitchen Design

Let's take a look at some common flow plans for food preparation that you'll discover inside the kitchen. The most basic, and most desirable, flow plan is the straight line, also known as the assembly-line flow. Materials move steadily from 1 procedure to another in a straight line. This type of style minimizes backtracking; it saves preparation time and confusion about what's going out of the kitchen area and what's coming back in.

The straight-line arrangement functions nicely for little installations because it can be placed against a wall and adapted to the cooks' duties. Wherever there is not enough room to arrange food preparation in a straight line, a well-liked and efficient option is the parallel flow. There are four variations of the parallel style:

1. Back to back. Gear is arranged inside a long, central counter or island in two straight lines that run parallel to every other. Sometimes a four- or five-foot room divider or low wall is positioned between the two lines. It's primarily a safety precaution, which keeps noise and clutter to a minimum and prevents liquids spilled on 1 side from spreading onto the other. Nevertheless, placement of a wall here also makes cleaning and sanitation a lot more hard. The back-to-back arrangement centralizes plumbing and utilities;

you may not need to install as many drains, sinks, or outlets, as both sides from the counter can share the same ones. A back-to-back arrangement in which the pass window is parallel to (and behind one of) the production places is sometimes recognized as a California-style kitchen. When the pass window is located perpendicular towards the production line, it might be referred to as a European-style kitchen area style. The benefit from the European style is that each cook on the line can see the progression of multiple dishes that make up 1 table's order.

2. Face to face. In this kitchen area configuration, a central aisle separates two straight lines of gear on either side from the room. Sometimes the aisle is wide sufficient to add a straight line of worktables among the two rows of gear. This setup works well for high volume feeding facilities like schools and hospitals, but it does not take benefit of single source utilities. Even though it's a great layout for supervision of workers, it forces individuals to perform with their backs to one another, in effect, separating the cooking from the food from the rest from the distribution procedure. Therefore, it's most likely not the best style for a restaurant.

3. L-shape. Wherever room is not sufficient for a straight-line or parallel arrangement, the L-shape kitchen design is nicely suited to access several groups of gear, and is adaptable for table service restaurants. It gives you the ability to place more equipment inside a smaller room. You'll often find an L-shape design in dish washing areas, using the dish machine positioned at the center corner from the L.

4. U-shape. This arrangement is seldom used, but it's ideal for a little room with one or two employees, such as a salad preparation or pantry area. An island bar, for example the ones in TGI Friday's restaurants, is an additional example of the U-shape at perform. There are also circular and square kitchen area designs, but their limited flow patterns make them impractical. Avoid wasted room if you can, by making your kitchen area rectangular, with its entrance on one of the longest walls to save steps.

The a lot more foodservice establishments you visit, the more you'll realize that the back from the house is really a separate and distinct entity from the rest of the business, with its own peculiar difficulties and unique solutions.

Correct flow planning occasionally means breaking each kitchen area function down into a department, of sorts, after which deciding how those departments ought to interact with every other. They must also interact using the other, external departments from the facility: your dining room, bar, cashier, and so on. A great way to begin the design process-both for the overall company and for the kitchen-is to create a bubble diagram. Each region (or workstation) is represented being a circle, or "bubble," drawn in pencil within the location you've decided may be the most logical for that function. If two different workstations will be sharing some equipment, you might let the sides of their circles intersect slightly, to indicate where the shared equipment might greatest be located.

The finished diagram will seem abstract, but the exercise permits you to visualize every perform center and think about its needs in relation to the other centers. You are able to also lay a kitchen out utilizing a diamond configuration, situating the cooking area at one point of the diamond form, and other crucial areas in relation to it at other points. Notice that this layout minimizes confusion (and accidents) with a separate kitchen entrance and exit. This allows the people who bus the tables to deliver soiled dishes towards the dishwashing area without having to walk via the entire kitchen to do so.

An alternative to drawing diagrams is to list every perform center and then list any other work middle that should be placed adjacent to it. Conversely, list any perform center that ought to not be next to it. For instance, it is most likely not a great idea to have the ice maker and ice storage bin adjacent to the frying and broiling center.

The Restaurant’s Service System

A main issue that must be addressed before deciding on a kitchen design is the way in which foods will be delivered to guests. This is recognized as the service system. A large operation, such as a hotel, can have more than 1 service program at work simultaneously: elegant tableside service, room support, and casual bar support. At the other end of the spectrum, quick-service restaurants employ service systems that emphasize speed and convenience, including takeout support and also the fast-food option of standing in the same counter to order, pay for, and wait for a meal served within minutes. Every service system has subsystems; together, they encompass each aspect from the progression of foods from kitchen area, to table, and back towards the dishwashing region.

This progression is known as flow, a lot like the traffic circulation of the busy street grid. There are two kinds of flow to consider when planning your kitchen area design: item flow and traffic circulation. Product circulation is the movement of all foods items, from their arrival in the receiving area, through the kitchen, to the guests. Visitors flow may be the movement of employees via the creating as they go about their duties. The perfect, in each kinds of circulation systems, would be to reduce backtracking and crossovers-again, to make sure the "streets" do not get clogged.

You will find 3 basic flow patterns in each food service operation: The raw materials to create every dish have a back-to-front-to-back flow pattern. They arrive in the back of the restaurant, in the kitchen area, where they're prepared. Then they travel to the front from the restaurant, to become served in the dining region. Finally, they return to the back again, as waste. The third type of traffic pattern may be the flow from the service staff as waiters choose up foods, deliver it to the guests, and clear the tables. On the busy night, the whole system really does resemble a busy freeway. As you may imagine, there's often the possibility of disaster if someone makes a wrong turn.

The key to managing these 3 types of circulation is that every ought to not interfere with the others. Within the kitchen, there's also a flow unique to every cooking section. It could be a pattern of steps the chefs adhere to to put every dish together or the methodical way the dishwashers scrape, sort, and wash dishes and dispose of waste. The support systems and flow designs of your business ought to guide your kitchen style. An operation with huge numbers to feed in short time periods will differ from 1 that also feeds big numbers but in a longer time period.

Can you see how? The distance from the kitchen towards the dining area is 1 essential consideration, and
kitchen designers have devised numerous strategies to cope with it. You might have noticed that, at some restaurants, the waiters are expected to do quite a few food-related tasks outside the kitchen area, at wait stations closer to the guests. They may slice and serve bread, ladle soup, arrange and dress salads, or pour beverages themselves. The idea is to speed support and preserve the (sometimes inadequate) kitchen area room for actual cooking tasks.

An additional critical decision to be made early within the style procedure: Should the waitstaff come into the kitchen area to choose up food, or should it be handed to them via a pass window between kitchen and dining area? Even though the pass window is considered informal, it could be used in a fancier restaurant, perhaps masked from public view by a wall or partition. Every of these items-distance and kitchen access-helps determine your flow designs. In a ideal world, flow designs would all be straight lines that do not intersect. However, this perfect is rarely achieved. 1 easy rule of thumb is that the faster you want your service to become, the more important it's that your circulation patterns do not cross. Inside a fast-service scenario, the flow lines must be short and straight.

The following time you're standing at a fast-food counter, notice how few steps most of the workers have to take to pour your soft drink, pick up your burger, and bag your fries. Speed ​​is the desired outcome.
The reverse is true inside a fine-dining establishment, wherever the work might all be done in the kitchen area in order to enhance the feeling of a leisurely dining experience. No clattering plates, no bustling wait stations right here. Now that we've looked in the circulation of people as they perform their restaurant duties, let's adhere to the foods flow line: the path of raw materials from the time they enter the creating to
the time they become leftovers.

The getting region is where the foods is unloaded from delivery trucks and brought into the building. Most restaurants locate their receiving places close to the back door. Our next stop is storage-dry storage, refrigerated storage, or freezer storage-where big quantities of food are held in the proper temperatures until needed. Foods that emerges from storage goes to one of a number of preparation, or prep, areas for vegetables, meats, or salad items. Slicing and dicing take location here, to prepare the food for its next stop: the production region. The size and function from the prep region varies widely, depending mostly on the style of service and type of kitchen area.

When most individuals believe of the restaurant kitchen, what they imagine is the manufacturing line. Right here the food is given its final form prior to serving: Boiling, sautéing, frying, baking, broiling, and steaming are the main activities of this area. The foods is plated and garnished prior to it heads out the door on a serving tray. And that's the end of the typical foods flow line. A number of kitchen perform centers are not included within the common food flow sequence but are closely tied to it. For instance, storage places ought to be in close proximity towards the preparation area, to minimize employees' walking back and forth. In some kitchens, there's a separate ingredient room, where everything required for one recipe is organized, to be picked up or delivered to a particular workstation.

Storage is much a lot more useful when it's placed close to the prep region than near the receiving region, saving steps for busy workers. The bakery is usually placed between the dry storage and cooking areas, because mixers and ovens could be shared using the cooking area. A meat-cutting region is also essential. It ought to be in close proximity to each refrigerators and sinks for safety and sanitation reasons too as for ease of cleanup. Keep in mind, however, that some kitchens are merely not big sufficient to accommodate separate, specialized work centers. Kitchen space planning becomes a matter of juggling priorities, and it is a continuous compromise.

As you juggle yours, think about every task being done in each work center. How essential is it towards the overall mission from the kitchen area? Are there duties that may be altered, rearranged, or eliminated altogether to save time and / or space? Some of the ideas that should be discussed here are: frequency of movements between numerous pieces of equipment, the distance between pieces of gear, allowing room for temporary "landing areas" for raw resources or finished plates to sit until required, putting gear on wheels so it could be rolled from one website to an additional, making "parking space" for the gear when it is not becoming utilized.

Merely stated, if work centers are adjacent to each other, without becoming cramped, you save time and energy; and if individuals who work in a lot more than one area have handy, unobstructed paths among those places, they can perform more efficiently. 1 work center that's frequently misplaced is the pot sink, which always seems to be relegated towards the most obscure back again corner of the kitchen area. True, it is not one of the most attractive area, but think from the numerous other work centers that depend on it. The common kitchen generates an overflow of pots and pans. Why is not the pot sink placed closer to the manufacturing line to deal using the mess?

And, speaking of pots, believe carefully about where to store them. Each clean and dirty, they take up a lot of room and require creative storage solutions. Frequently pot / pan racks can hang directly above the sink area, giving dishwashers a handy location to shop clean pots directly from the drain board. (Remember that anything stored near the floor has to be at least 6 inches off the floor for health causes.)

Environmental issues Affecting the Travel Industry

Protecting the environment is now one of the most talked-about and hotly-debated topics across the globe. Many companies are spending hundreds of millions of dollars to create products or make their products environmentally friendly. An example is the electric car that is being looked at as a viable option to that of the present gasoline powered car. In 2009 world leaders met in Copenhagen to discuss ways in which they can prevent global warming and reduce on the effects of climate change, in effect protecting the environment. The travel industry too has not been left out of this issue. In an industry where the number of people engaged in international travel has been predicted to reach the billion mark in 2010, there is concern about its contribution to the damage done to the environment. Also like every other industry the travel industry needs to be concerned about ways of doing business that are environmentally friendly. Outlined below are some of the environmental issues affecting the travel industry which stakeholders need to address and in some cases seek out long term solutions.

1. Aviation which ferries hundreds of thousands of tourists across the globe is of great concern to those seeking to protect the environment. A major concern for the industry is greenhouse gas emissions and their implication for climate change. Aviation produces at least two percent of emissions. One way the aviation industry is working on this problem is by rolling out newer planes that have fuel efficient engines which means less carbon emissions. However not all airlines especially in the poorer countries can afford buying new aircraft.

2. Mass tourism. With the cost of travel becoming cheaper and more and more people venturing further away from their countries to places that were formerly inaccessible but can now be reached because of air transport, areas of environmental and historical significance are becoming crowed. This is putting pressure on ecosystems within these areas and threatening the fluor and fauna. Also climate change is going to mean that certain places will not favor visitors because of weather conditions becoming extreme which will lead to overcrowding in other places with more favorable weather conditions. Again this presents a danger to the ecosystems in the overcrowded areas and to the tourism of the area.

3. Deforestation. In spite of the worldwide call to protect the environment there are still areas where massive logging is taking place. This is also contributing to destruction of flora and fauna and is a threat to the tourism in those areas.

4. With the call to go green affecting all industries across the globe the tourism industry has not been left out. There is pressure on those who are in the industry to find methods of doing business that are sustainable and environmentally friendly. For example can the hotel industry build hotels that are more environmentally friendly? What methods can they use to conserve energy and reduce on chemicals that are used in the dry cleaning of tons of laundry used in the industry?

5. Human encroachment. With populations continuing to grow worldwide there is now competition between man and animals for space. Humans are now encroaching on areas like National Parks that are protected and marked for wildlife. This has led to reports of people and their livestock being killed by wild animals which in turn leads to people hunting and killing these animals that are considered to be a threat. This is a threat to the tourism of the area. Human encroachment is also forcing animals to move away from their habitat to other areas where they can not survive leading to the extinction of certain species.

Disadvantages of Online Bus Booking

The idea or trend of online bus booking has steadfastly climbed the popularity graph, and has the potential of scoring over its physical counterpart in the very near future. However, as akin to a coin, there is another side to this success story too. There are a number of facts that you should be consciously aware of while out shopping for the best deals in the transportation arena. Even though there are numerous advantages of hopping on the web-based reservation bandwagon, callousness in selecting your firm or reading the fine print may land you in serious trouble – both financial as well as legal.

Recent news, though, has been positive as far as online bus booking is concerned, with GTDC (Goa Tourism Development Corporation) embracing the trend. With government authorities also recognizing the brighter side of web reservations, the darker side of the same is being pushed farther away from public notice.

However, here are a few drawbacks of the online bus booking service, which at times mar the enjoyable experience of reserving a place for yourself on a transport vehicle from the confines of your home:

  • Authenticity

– A lot of portals use the facade of the web as a wall to present fake licenses and registration documents, often convincing the clients of their non-existent authenticity. Make sure you check with the local authorities or with that of the state of origin of the agency, to avoid being conned by the latter.

  • Hidden Costs

– Potential clients often miss out on reading the fine print or hidden terms and conditions stated in the quote. This allows the agency to charge a much higher sum (hidden costs) than the quoted price.

  • Restricted Options

– Some web-based bus reservation sites provide a much restricted outlook – some may offer a cheaper quote on a package tour, conveniently missing out on half of the tourist spots you may have wished to visit had you visited a local travel or booking agency.

  • Special Requirements

– Very few online bus booking services take into consideration special needs of aged or handicapped people. This creates problems for such individuals.

  • Direct Support

– The absence of authentic customer care support, one-on-one interaction and similar after-sales support may cause communication as well as troubleshooting turn limp, even while you are on a trip.

Therefore, even though online bus booking has been a boon for customers who would rather enjoy a quiet laze in their homes, it may turn into a menace too.

Only a handful of online portals provide the standard of service ideally demanded by customers. You can also look up a firm like Ezeego1, which provides online bus booking services in over 4000 pan-India routes, all in a jiffy!